Noble Gases: Trends and Patterns

Edited by SarMal, Sharingknowledge

On the right hand column of the periodic table, you will see elements in group 0. These are called noble gases and all of them are non-reactive or inert.

Noble Gases Trends and Patterns 40418.jpg

The elements considered noble gasses are:

  • Helium (He)
  • Neon (Ne)
  • Argon (Ar)
  • Krypton (Kr)
  • Xenon (Xe)
  • Radon (Rn)
  • Oganesson (Og)

The nobel gases have high ionization energy and very low electron affinity. Because of this, they considered non-reactive. With the exception of helium, the noble gases all have s and p electron coverings and are unable to easily create chemical compounds.

Was this helpful? Yes | No| I need help
Ad

Shared Patterns

Shared Patterns 83937.jpg

Noble gases all have similar properties that include:

  • They are all considered non-metals.
  • They are all colorless.
  • They are all monatomic.
  • They are all non-reactive.

Because they are non-reactive and chemically inert, the noble gases have the largest ionization energies.

Noble Gases: Trends

Noble gases also have shared trends that change (either increasing or decreasing) as you move down the noble gas column of the periodic table.

  1. 1
    The noble gases have weak van Der Waals forces within their atoms
    .
    This is because the atoms increase in size moving down the column.
    Advertisement
    Was this step helpful? Yes | No| I need help
  2. 2
    As non-metals, the noble gases have low boiling points
    .
    The boiling points increase moving down the column.
    Was this step helpful? Yes | No| I need help
  3. 3
    Atomic mass increases moving down the column
    .
    Was this step helpful? Yes | No| I need help
  4. 4
    The density of the noble gases also changes moving down the column
    .
    Helium has the lowest density while Radon is the densest gas. This increase relates to the increase in atomic mass moving down the column.
    Was this step helpful? Yes | No| I need help
  5. 5
    The increase of interatomic forces moving down the column also increases the melting point of each gas moving down the column
    .
    Was this step helpful? Yes | No| I need help
  6. 6
    Because of the electron covering on all the noble gases except helium, their electrons generally remain the same
    .
    Was this step helpful? Yes | No| I need help
  7. 7
    As the radius increases moving down the column the potential for ionization decreases
    .
    This is because the electrons in bigger noble gases are located away from the nucleus and held less tightly by the atom.
    Was this step helpful? Yes | No| I need help
  8. 8
    Compared to other elements, the noble gases have very low boiling and melting points
    .
    Noble Gases Trends and Patterns 79873.jpg
    Was this step helpful? Yes | No| I need help
    Advertisement

Referencing this Article

If you need to reference this article in your work, you can copy-paste the following depending on your required format:

APA (American Psychological Association)
Noble Gases: Trends and Patterns. (2017). In ScienceAid. Retrieved Oct 23, 2017, from https://scienceaid.net/Noble_Gases:_Trends_and_Patterns

MLA (Modern Language Association) "Noble Gases: Trends and Patterns." ScienceAid, scienceaid.net/Noble_Gases:_Trends_and_Patterns Accessed 23 Oct 2017.

Chicago / Turabian ScienceAid.net. "Noble Gases: Trends and Patterns." Accessed Oct 23, 2017. https://scienceaid.net/Noble_Gases:_Trends_and_Patterns.

If you have problems with any of the steps in this article, please ask a question for more help, or post in the comments section below.

Comments

ScienceAid welcomes all comments. If you do not want to be anonymous, register or log in. It is free.

Article Info

Recent edits by: SarMal

Share this Article:

Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 32 times.

Do you have a question not answered in this article?
Click here to ask one of the writers of this article
x

Thank Our Volunteer Authors.

Would you like to give back to the community by fixing a spelling mistake? Yes | No