Solubility of salts

Edited by Jamie (ScienceAid Editor), Taylor (ScienceAid Editor), Sim

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Soluble and Insoluble Salts

Use the table below to identify which salts are soluble, and which salts are not.

Soluble Insoluble
All Sodium, Potassium and ammonium
Chlorides Except silver and lead, chlorides
All Ethanoates
Sulphate Except calcium, barium and lead sulphates
All Nitrates
Sodium, potassium and ammonium carbonates

and hydroxides

All other carbonates and hydroxides are insoluble

Preparing Soluble Salts

To prepare soluble salts you must form crystals of them.

  1. 1
    React the reactants
    .
    If it's not already done, to get the soluble salt, you must react the reactants.
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  2. 2
    Filter
    .
    Then the solution is passed through filter paper into an evaporating dish to remove excess solid material.
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  3. 3
    Wait
    .
    Now leave the solution. The liquid should evaporate and crystals of the salt will form in the dish.
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Preparing Insoluble Salts

A precipitate is the name given to a solid salt that forms when an insoluble salt is produced from a reaction. For example, with barium chloride and magnesium sulphate...

Barium Chloride + Magnesium Sulphate ==>> Barium Sulphate + Magnesium Chloride BaCl2 + MgSO4 ==>> BaSO4 + MgCl2.

You will see a white precipitate of barium sulphate ...

a precipiate of barium sulphate above a solution of magnesium chloride solution

To get a pure, dry sample of Barium Sulphate it must be:

  1. 1
    Filtered.
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  2. 2
    Washed with distilled water,
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  3. 3
    Left to allow the excess water to evaporate.
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Questions and Answers

Please I need to get the solublities of mgcl2,cacl2,alcl3,nacl,li in acid and base?

Please help me out to get those answers because ii have searched the internet. Help out wit the questions please and I would really appreciate

The molar solubility represented by s is the concentration of a dissolved salt in an ionic solution. To find 's', you can use the solubility constant Ksp. For example, for the dissociation of MgCl2

 *MgCl2      →   Mg++  +  2Cl-
    
                 s        2s
    
  
  Ksp = [s][2s]2 

  Ksp= 4s3
  s3=Ksp/4
  s = 3√(Ksp/4)

Referencing this Article

If you need to reference this article in your work, you can copy-paste the following depending on your required format:

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APA (American Psychological Association)
Solubility of salts. (2017). In ScienceAid. Retrieved Apr 29, 2017, from https://scienceaid.net/chemistry/applied/solubilityofsalts.html

MLA (Modern Language Association) "Solubility of salts." ScienceAid, scienceaid.net/chemistry/applied/solubilityofsalts.html Accessed 29 Apr 2017.

Chicago / Turabian ScienceAid.net. "Solubility of salts." Accessed Apr 29, 2017. https://scienceaid.net/chemistry/applied/solubilityofsalts.html.

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Article Info

Categories : Applied

Recent edits by: Taylor (ScienceAid Editor), Jamie (ScienceAid Editor)

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