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Homeostasis: Negative Feedback, Body Temperature, Blood Glucose

Edited by Sharingknowledge, Kylieeleanne

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Why is blood temperature a negative feedback loop?

I am in a "project lead the way class" and I was wondering why our body temperature is a negative feedback loop. Is it possible that you can help me with my problem? In the article, I do not see an explanation of why our body temperature is a negative feedback loop

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  1. 1
    The human body has set values called set points that for example, the set point for body temperature is 37.5 degrees
    .
    If the body senses a change from that temperature it will work on a negative feedback loop to counteract the change. This negative feedback loop is known as homeostasis Most may not know this, but this negative feedback loop is happening on an almost constant basis, to counteract different external temperatures and other factors. Even the smallest variance in our bodies internal temperature could be dangerous or even deadly!
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  2. 2
    Temperature isn't the only thing our bodies need to keep at a set point, our stomachs use homeostasis to maintain a Ph level, different from surrounding organs; it is also used to maintain set ion levels in our blood
    .
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  3. 3
    The biological systems in our bodies are constantly being driven away from their set points
    .
    When we work out, our bodies temperature spikes, when we drink a can of soda our glucose levels rise significantly. Our bodies use negative feedback loops to oppose the stimuli that drive these changes.
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  4. 4
    An example of how a body's negative feedback loops works would be a change is temperature spike being sensed by nerve endings in the skin and brain that would then send a message to the brain's control center the hypothalamus
    .
    In turn, the hypothalamus would tell the body's sweat glands to open. If opening the sweat glands proves to not be enough, the hypothalamus would send more signals out, to induce heavy breathing and increase blood flow to the skin, effectively bringing the bodies temperature back to the norm.
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  5. 5
    If you are below 37.5 degrees core temperature, your body will instead restrict the flow of blood to the skin, and you will begin shivering to generate body heat; this is also considered a negative feedback loop.
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The above questions are from the following wiki...
biology/humans/homeostasis.html



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